Soil Water Process Blog

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The Marena Oklahoma In-situ Soil Moisture Testbed (MOISST) annual workshop took place in Lincoln, NE. Pedro Rossini (Kansas State University), Destiny Kerr (Oklahoma State University), and Justin Gibson (University of Nebraska-Lincoln) were the winners of the graduate student competition sponsored by Stevens probes. Learn more about the MOISST workshop here.
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Installing one of our rover modules at the Konza Prarie. The Soil Water Processes Lab and the Micrometeorology Lab (led by Dr. Eduardo Santos) are conducting research about evapotranspiration partitioning by coupling a cosmic-ray probe and an eddy covariance system.
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Dr. Keith Bristow (CSIRO, Townsville, Australia) visited out lab and visited with students about ongoing research in our lab. Dr. Bristow was the 2018 Ellis Lecturer in the department of Agronomy.
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Dr. Keith Bristow (CSIRO, Townsville, Australia) visited out lab and visited with students about ongoing research in our lab. Dr. Bristow was the 2018 Ellis Lecturer in the department of Agronomy.
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This week we've been sampling several no-till fields of Knopf farms near Gypsum, KS. In almost every sample we found earth worms in action near the soil surface.
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Nathaniel Parker and Edwin Akley don't chicken out when we need to take soil samples during the crude Kansas winter.
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One of many transects using our roving cosmic-ray neutron probe. Each transect has 110 miles (176 km) and takes about 4 hours to complete.
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Daphne Lofing won the second place in the undergraduate student poster competition with her research about using a new color sensor to determine soil color and characterize soil spatial variability.
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Andres was presenting research about using soil moisture measurements to delineate field management zones. The on-farm tour was organized by the Kansas Corn Commission and KSU crops.
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Taking soil moisture measurements in dry and hard soil can result in instrument damage. The picture shows one of our CS Hydrosense II hand-held sensors after recording soil moisture in a field near Gypsum, KS under dry conditions. I guess we will need to order new rods.
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Large cracks are a common problem when installing neutron probe access tubes in soils that exhibit shrink-swell properties. These cracks can substantially affect readings, underestimating soil moisture content.
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Samuel Long working late afternoon to install soil moisture sensors along the root-zone in a long-term no-tillage field at the North Agronomy Farm.